More than 54 million Americans over the age of 50 have been diagnosed with osteoporosis. This disease causes the bones to be brittle and fragile as a result of low mass and tissue. In a healthy body, the bone tissue is constantly being broken down (a process called resorbed) and then reformed. This process happens so frequently that healthy bodies actually replace their entire skeleton every 10 years.

As our bodies grow during our childhood, our bones reform faster than they resorb. However, this imbalance switches when osteoporosis hits later in life. This disease occurs most frequently in older women, causing one in two women to break a bone as a result of osteoporosis.

Risk Factors

The National Osteoporosis Foundation has identified several key lifestyle factors that can increase the chances of developing osteoporosis. Two of the biggest risk factors are lack of exercise and calcium in your daily diet.

Our bones become stronger in response to strength training like lifting weights. Those who do not engage in regular exercise and lead sedimentary lifestyles can increase their chances of an osteoporosis diagnosis. Our bones also need a steady supply of calcium to support the reforming process. Regularly eating calcium-rich foods like yogurt, almonds, and milk can be a great defense against osteoporosis. Other risk factors include smoking, having one or more alcoholic beverage a day, and consuming more than 30oz of coffee a day.


As with most diseases, the best way to prevent osteoporosis is as simple as a healthy diet and regular exercise. As stated above, weight training and a calcium-rich diet are the best way to curb the effects of osteoporosis. It’s never too early to start thinking about osteoporosis prevention, especially for young women. Taking steps at a young age to prevent osteoporosis is much easier than trying to treat the symptoms after the disease has set in.